“The mind is
everything. What you think, you become.
— Buddha

About Psychology

 

WHAT IS A CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST?

A Clinical Psychologist is a Psychologist with additional training specialising in the area of Clinical Psychology – the area of psychology involved in assessment, diagnosing and treating severe mental illness. Clinical Psychologists have a 4-year undergraduate training in Psychology with Honours, in addition to a 2-year Post-graduate training in Clinical Psychology and followed by two years of Registrar Training in clinical psychology whilst working within a mental health setting. Post-graduate and Registrar training requires completion of a wide range of requirements including coursework, practical placements, supervision, thesis, and specialist capability competencies. Clinical Psychologists can work within a wide variety of settings including: private practice, hospitals, universities & other research institutions, not-for-profit organisations, for large corporations, amongst others.therapy1-300x300

WHAT CAN A CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST HELP WITH?

Clinical Psychologists are not only able to assess, diagnose and treat severe mental illness, but they are also able to help people experiencing less severe emotional and psychological issues. For a comprehensive list of conditions and issues that a Clinical Psychologist is able to provide intervention for, please visit our ‘Areas of Treatment’ section.

ARE MY MENTAL HEALTH CONCERNS ‘BAD ENOUGH’ FOR IT TO BE OKAY FOR ME TO SEE A CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST?

Psychological concerns range along a continuum from mild to severe. For example, you may be experiencing some anxiety or depressive symptoms like feeling low, finding it hard to get motivated, feeling loss of confidence, nervous or shaky. These concerns may not be at the severity which would indicate a diagnosis of a depressive or anxiety ‘disorder’, however if they are enough to bother you, cause distress or concern to yourself and others, affect daily functioning or interfere with your relationships then you should speak to someone. It is important to understand that you do not have to have ‘severe’ symptoms for it to be helpful to see a Clinical Psychologist to get help for your wellbeing concerns. We often have people come into our practice stating that they feel ‘silly’ for being there asking for help because they think their issues are not that ‘serious’ or as ‘bad’ in comparison to others. What we want to express is that if your mental health difficulties are concerning you or interfering with your functioning and/or enjoyment, then your concerns are important and seeing a Clinical Psychologist would be helpful.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PSYCHOLOGIST AND A CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST?

A Psychologist has completed the undergraduate psychology training at university and two years of supervised practice and competencies within a workplace setting to obtain full registration as a Psychologist. Psychologists have not undergone the additional training to specialise in the area of clinical psychology. The Medicare rebate for a psychological consultation with Psychologist is $84.40 and for a Clinical Psychologists it’s $126.50. Additionally, some organisations such as Centrelink or insurance companies require Psychological Reports to be completed by either a Clinical Psychologist or a Psychiatrist.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A PSYCHOLOGIST & A PSYCHIATRIST?

A Psychiatrist is a Doctor who has obtained the required medical training to practice within Australia. Psychiatrists have completed their specialty training within the area of Psychiatry (as opposed to other Doctors who have chosen a different specialty such as Orthopedics, Neurosurgery etc). Psychiatrists have also undergone training in the assessment, diagnosis and treatment for severe mental illness, however their primary method of intervention is typically pharmacotherapy (medications) with some psychological strategies provided. As Psychiatrists are Doctors, they are authorized to prescribe medications to clients, where as Psychologists/Clinical Psychologists are not. Psychiatrists work within private practice, and they will also be found within public Mental Health settings such as psychiatric hospitals, community treatment teams etc as the leading practitioner for the mental health team. Clinical Psychologists and Psychiatrists often work alongside each other, however a client does not have to see both if this is not necessary for management of their presenting issues. With regards to treatment, the approach of a Clinical Psychologist is that of the provision of evidence-based psychological therapies such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Mindfulness Therapy, Schema Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT), Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT), Narrative Therapy, Solutions-Focused Therapy, amongst others.

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